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News/Business. Breaking and in-depth news coverage from America and around the world. New. (CC) (Stereo)

DURATION
00:31:00

RATING

SCANNED IN
San Francisco, CA, USA

SOURCE
Comcast Cable

TUNER
Channel v107

VIDEO CODEC
mpeg2video

AUDIO CODEC
ac3

PIXEL WIDTH
704

PIXEL HEIGHT
480

TOPIC FREQUENCY

Syria 4, Washington 4, Dr. King 3, California 3, Obama 2, U.n. 2, United Nations 2, Mr. Neil 2, U.s. 2, Us 2, Ifornia 1, Assad 1, Un 1, Yosemite 1, Syrian State 1, Al Jazeera 1, Barack Obama 1, Chuck Hagel 1, Angela Kane 1, Tennessee 1,
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  Al Jazeera America    News    News/Business. Breaking and in-depth news coverage  
   from America and around the world. New. (CC) (Stereo)  

    August 24, 2013
    12:00 - 12:31pm EDT  

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>> the chief united nations weapons inspector arrives in damascus as president obama meets with his national security team to discuss options on syr syria. wildfire spreads into yosemite park and a new threat to francisco. >> i have a dream that one day this nation will rise up, live out the true meaning of its creed. we hold these truths to be self-evident, that all men are created equal. >> remembering the dream and the dreamer 50 years later.
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>> thousands of people making their way through washington, d.c. for days of festivities marking that historic speech from dr. martin about howg jr. and the march on
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much this day this movement has changed life for africa americans. what has it meant for if you? >> well, the original march was a turning point for me in my life because it was the first time that i was able to really stand up for what i believed. i knew it was right. i knew it was right to my bones to go to
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>> yeah 7.
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>> for his take on today's event gas thevent, for the first timee have whites and blacks in intimate settings, allowed to go to church together, organize together, it was those relationships away from the camera, away from the microphones that allowed folks to get to know each other in ways that they hadn't been able to get to know each other before. >> reporter: mr. neil there is so much emphasis on dr. king, but the movement took place in basements around the countriers people who were afraid they would lose their jobs. >> these are folks who were organizers at the highest level. because of what they did, they
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figure out creative ways to connect. the names that we don't talk a lot about that we have today, folks who had relationships going back to the highlander school in tennessee in the 1950s. they proposed a march like the march on washington in 1941 in order to deal with issues in terms of jobs. this was not the culmination of anything or the beginning of anything. it's just another mile post on this long history of racial struggle in this country and pursuit of black freedom, if yo.
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[[voiceover]] no doubt about it, innovation changes our lives. opening doors ... opening possibilities. taking the impossible from lab ... to life.
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on techknow, our scientists bring you a sneak-peak of the future, and take you behind the scenes at our evolving world. techknow - ideas, invention, life. >> welcome back to al jazeera. president barack obama is meeting security advisers at the white house to discuss the u.s. response to an alleged chemical attack in syria. just this morning united nations group say they have treated 3,000 for neurotoxic symptoms. angela kane wants ac mandarin keys to the site of the alleged chemical attack that happened wednesday.
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>> reporter: the two tiny bodies hang limp in his arms. what will i do, crisis the father. [ sobbing ] the man destroyed by grief. pictures like these of the many men, women and children indiscriminately killed in what all evidence suggests was a chemical attack continue to shock the world. the syrian government still refuse access to the u.n. group down the road. restricted to an agreement that they agreed to, agreement to inspect the site of alleged
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attacks weeks ago. secretary of state chuck hagel told president barack obama. >> it indicates to look at what happened in syria over the last few days. some experts say not only assad has access to chemical agents. >> they may be the only ones who have access to the missile technology that may be being discovered at this time, but these types of chemical weapons are not very, very difficult to manufacture. >> reporter: syrian state tv is reporting the military have found chemical weapons in rebel
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control tunnels. syria's biggest ally russia say they must cooperate and allow the u.n. to investigate last week's attack. >> the shift is really, really small, and there is no education that should western countries or a group or coalition of the willing once again intervene in military fashion even in limited way. there is no indication that russia that would be slightly cooperative. >> reporter: barack obama security crisisser advisers aret the white house. >> let's bring in al jazeera
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mike in washington. let's be honest, in the u.s. believes it has happened before. >> reporter: that's right. >> this video is awful. it's difficult to watch, but what's different couldthe case against any sort f intervention military or otherwise on the part of western powers has been laid out before. it's too costly. you don't know who you're helping. it could
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these weapons there have been two national security council meetings here in washington in the white house over the course of the last threere
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talking about over and over even as they deliberate at this hour. >> and of course there is the humanitarian crisis. keep us posted on what comes out of this today. >> reporter: i will. >> california governor jerry brown has declared a state of emergency. look at these flames tearing through acres of woodlands of yosemite national park. officials say it's one of the largest in california history, and that is saying something. the fear now is that millions of people in northern california could lose their water and electricity. we have the latest. >> so to provide us the latest updates on the fire is teen i can't walker from california governor's office of emergency
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service. she joins us from california. i think what people find the most interesting is this is affecting people as far as the northernest part of the state. could you explain that to us? >> reporter: the rim fire has made substantial impact statewide. we have air quality impacts and we have the fire threatening the watererwater reservoir. we have the impacts of the fire of the county and of the water reservoir that supports san francisco county and they are clean water system. >> are you having to pull in people from other states? ho are you on manpower? >> you know, resources are stretched across the state. we have resources coming not only from neighboring
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jurisdictions of fire location but across the state. but what we have on the rim fire, it's a state priority, we have over a thousand firefighters working on that fire around the clock, and resource versus come literally from across the tate to--across the state to assist in that battle. >> where do we stand on evacuations? >> have have been ten communities under evacuation advisory. they are strongly encouraged to seek shelter elsewhere. there is a shelter set up at the fairground there in the county, and we've had people utilizing that facility. there is a concern, yes, because the fire is now well over 125,000 acres and only 25% contained. what makes this fire most treacherous, it's high terrain, rural area, it's timber burning mostly. the threats, the evacuations are
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advisory and precautionary right now. and we're really focused on getting all resources out there to get some good containment on this so it doesn't continue to threaten communities where people are living and sheltered right now. we have a lot of support from across the state. >> please keep us posted. i understand that this is a ifornia. situation for you. keep it here at al jazeera for the other side of the break. un.
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mr. neil, what has happened so far and what needs to happen next. >> one of the things that we have to remember when we go back 50 years ago, this was really a youth movement. dr. king himself was 34 years old. diane nash was in the early moments of the organizations of snik was a teenager at that time. we have to find better ways to
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connect these kind of moments, this struggle, this moment, to young folks. i don't think enough young folks see themselves in these movements from 50 years ago, and we have to go able to connect their goals, their concerns, their crisis to these organizational strategies that were so effective in
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ago. >> i don't think dr. king would be so shocked. it's not power but having a strong movement to push forward legislation. it's great we have president's office, but we know that president obama's agenda has not been enacted, and we have to make sure that american middle class agenda has been pushed forward. that has not happened at the level we had hoped but i in the last fogether trying to pick up and take that baton of activism movement. i'm sure he would be disappointed that we haven't gotten to the economic equality that he was advocating for particularly at the end of his life, that we're investing so much in incarceration and war but not
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